Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
from republican senator bob corker. tonight, we get a different perspective on the question of so-called entitlements. many lawmakers and economists have argued it's essential to make big changes to medicare and social security. among those ideas are raising the eligibility age; means- testing for wealthy recipients; cuts in spending and benefits and a bigger role for private competition in health care. max richtman has been arguing against making many of these changes as part of this fight. he's the president of an advocacy group, the national committee to preserve social security and medicare. he joins us now. >> welcome. >> thank you for inviting me. >> first of all, why shouldn't social security and medicare be part of the entire group of government spending programs that are being looked at to get to deal with the deficits? >> well, before i answer that i was very interested in the way you characterized these programs as entitlements. so-called, you said, entitlements. and we think that a better term would be earned benefits. you know, i counted the letters in the word "entit
there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence of what i experienced and what i saw, i am not trying to write the defensive history and others will have a different perspective on things, but it was -- we were at war every day of the four and a half years i was in office, and as i write in the book it wasn't just the wars in iraq and afghanistan, it was daily wars with the congress, with other agencies, with the white house, and also i would say with my own building, w
of defense. bill gates, a very good secretary of defense, -- bob gates said to me you need quickly to cultivate and devote time to relationships because you realize you're in this together. >> completely agree. and i would say if anything the pendulum is coming back hardener that direction. >> rose: meaning what? >> meaning coming out of the crisis. i think there's less trust in general. >> rose: it's part of the job in washington. so you value relationship very much and so there are hundreds of c.e.o.s that i know who i can pick up the phone and they trust g.e. and they trust g.e. because they know me or my team and i think that's immensely valuable and i think in the end it's important that business leaders and politicians have a better sense of trust than maybe what we've had over the last five years and, again, those things never work unless you assume you're 50% of the problem. that's what you've got to -- >> rose: assume you're 50% of the problem? in other words -- >> i'm not blameless. >> there's two kinds of advice you can give. this is what i try to do. one is here's what
richman; and republican senator bob corker. gwen ifill has our next installment. >> ifill: a senior democrat on the house banking committee and the vice chair of the centrist new democrat coalition. welcome, congresswoman. we heard earlier today from john boehner and from jay carney at the white house, one saying spending cuts aren't serious coming from the house and the other saying the white house has put forth all the spending cuts that need to be put out. how do you prioritize what should be the focus here: spending cuts or raising revenue? >> most of us know it's got to be both. the fact is the president put out a really very sensible plan, middle-ground where it actually included spending cuts. we've already done a trillion dollars and we'll be doing another trillion dollars over a trillion dollars in cuts. that's $2 trillion. that's serious spending cuts over and above what we've done already. and of course we do think there has to be some revenue. then we're going to make sure we're doing the right kind of investments so we see economic growth. if it's not all three we're no
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)